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Liturgical Press

Vision

The Scholarly Contributions of Mark Searle to Liturgical Renewal

Anne Y. Koester and Barbara Searle, Editors

Vision
Vision

ISBN: 9780814629437, 2943

Details: 288 pgs, 6 x 9
Publication Date: 03/01/2004
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This collection of essays by the late Mark Searle provides insights for liturgical study and application. Expanding upon theological ideas and visions, Mark Searle's essays combine theory with practice to topics such as pastoral liturgical studies, the nature of liturgy, the operation of sacraments, and the role of culture in the Church. Introductions by current scholars precede each essay and provide background and introductory information.

Chapters are: "Serving the Lord with Justice," "Liturgy as Metaphor," "The Pedagogical Function of the Liturgy," "Reflections on Liturgical Reform," "New Tasks, New Methods: The Emergence of Pastoral Liturgical Studies," "Images and Worship," "Infant Baptism Reconsidered," "Private Religion, Individualistic Society, and Common Worship," "Fons Vitae: A Case Study in the Use of Liturgy as a Theological Source," "Marriage Rites as Documents of Faith: Notes for a Theology of Marriage," "Mark Searle: A Chronology 1941-1992," and "Mark Searle: A Bibliography 1966-1995."

Anne Y. Koester is associate director of the Georgetown Center for Liturgy in Washington, D.C. She also edited Liturgy and Justice: To Worship God in Spirit and in Truth published by Liturgical Press.

Barbara Searle is a psychologist at the Madison Center and Hospital in South Bend, Indiana and an adjunct assistant professor at the University of Notre Dame.

ISBN: 9780814629437, 2943

Details: 288 pgs, 6 x 9
Publication Date: 03/01/2004

Reviews

This collection will be a welcome addition to any liturgical library. . . . The entire work is worth serious re-reading and reflection.
Pastoral Music

An important harvest of communications on the Western Church's public prayer in theory and practice, with perceptive updates as a bonus. Persons new to the various liturgical offices, take notice!
Gerard S. Sloyan, Priest of Trenton, School of Theology and Religious Studies, The Catholic University of America

These essays are as timely today as when they were first written.
Worship

Vision is an invaluable collection of ten diverse and readable—but profound—essays on liturgical development by the eminent Mark Searle, who writes with scholarly insights but always with an eye to the pragmatic and pastoral. Its publication is appropriate at this moment of specious liturgical negativity (in high places and in low places) since the articles look to the needed future progress of the Christian liturgy. This is always done with relation to the totality of human life, the creative adaptation we have come to call inculturation. The introductions to each essay by ten other renowned scholars, equally open to a progressing liturgy, serve as a kind of guarantor of church progress in Christian life. Vision is well worth a reflective reading.
Frederick R. McManus

This book provides a vital testimony of the vision of a man imbued with a passionate love for liturgy and for the Church.
The Way

The insights found in Mark Searle's writings are as timely today as when they were written. He asked the hard questions and the rich introductory essays by contemporary liturgical scholars continue that discussion. This collection of selected articles is not only a fitting memorial to Mark Searle but an inspiration and valuable resource for all who love the liturgy.
Catherine Dooley, O.P., School of Theology and Religious Studies, The Catholic University of America

This collection of essays by Mark Searle (1941-1992) provides an appropriate memorial to him, exhibiting the scope of his interests and the richness of his contributions with regard to the study of liturgy and liturgical renewal.
Catholic Books Review

This is a very good book, representing the intellectual legacy of a very good man. A strong collection of Mark Searle's finest articles—and a rich range of colleagues and students in dialogue with those articles—call us to see that Searle's pastoral liturgical studies should still engage us. These studies anticipate and deepen current conversations on public meaning, ecclesial community, the nature of reform, metaphor and image, pedagogy, and justice. Indeed, current thought would be the better were it always marked by the characteristics so abundantly present in Searle's work: honest history and engaged witness; reverence and critique; poetry and precision.
Gordon W. Lathrop, Charles A. Schieren Professor of Liturgy, Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

More than a decade after the untimely death of Mark Searle (Y´1992), theologians continue to assess his contribution to Sacramental Theology and Pastoral Liturgy. In this volume of selected essays written by Searle between 1980 and 1992 leading writers add their reflections and reminiscences. The Church is grateful to Barbara Searle and Anne Koester for keeping Mark's memory and thought alive.
Michael S. Driscoll, Liturgical Studies, University of Notre Dame