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Dust in the Blood

Dust in the Blood

A Theology of Life with Depression
Jessica Coblentz

PRODUCT DETAILS
ISBN: 9780814685020, 8502
Details: 248 pgs, 6 x 9
Publication Date: 01/15/2022

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Dust in the Blood considers the harrowing realities of life with depression from a Christian theological perspective. In conversation with popular Christian theologies of depression that justify why this suffering exists and prescribe how people ought to relate to it, Coblentz offers another Christian approach to this condition: she reflects on depression as a wilderness experience. Weaving first-person narratives of depression, contemporary theologies of suffering, and ancient biblical tales of the wilderness, especially the story of Hagar, Coblentz argues for and contributes to an expansion of Christian ideas about what depression is, how God relates to it, and how Christians should understand and respond to depression in turn.

Jessica Coblentz, PhD, is an assistant professor in the Department of Religious Studies and Theology at Saint Mary’s College in Notre Dame, Indiana, where her research and teaching focuses on Catholic systematic theology, feminist theologies, and mental health in theological perspective.

"Born from Coblentz's own experience, Dust in the Blood is a loving theological accompaniment of all who live with chronic depression. As a systematic theologian, she expresses this love by offering new insight into the classic theological discussion of suffering and by arguing that those with depression deserve better than silencing or moralizing. Any Christian theologian reflecting on what it means to be human should read this book, as should anybody who lives with depression or ministers to people with depression."
Elizabeth Antus, Assistant Professor of the Practice, Boston College

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