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A significant milestone in
the history of feminism and
the study of Scripture.

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The Team of Contributors

Wisdom Commentary includes voices from top feminist scholars of many different religious traditions; of diverse ages; differing sexual identities; and varying cultural, racial, ethnic, and social contexts. Some have been pioneers in feminist biblical interpretation. Others are newer contributors from a younger generation.

This series includes feminist men, both as lead authors and as contributing voices. Each volume will also incorporate diverse voices and differing interpretations from various parts of the world, underlining the importance of social positioning in the process of interpretation, and the fact that there is no single definitive feminist interpretation of a text.

Learn more about the team by:

Canonical Order

Alphabetical Order

EDITORIAL TEAM
Barbara E. Reid, general editor, co-author of Luke, is a Dominican Sister of Grand Rapids, Michigan. She holds a PhD in biblical studies from The Catholic University of America and is professor of New Testament studies at Catholic Theological Union, Chicago. Her most recent publications areWisdom’s Feast: An Invitation to Feminist Interpretation of the Scriptures (2016) and Abiding Word: Sunday Reflections on Year A, B, C (3 vols.; 2011, 2012, 2013). She served as vice president and academic dean at CTU from 2009 to 2018 and as president of the Catholic Biblical Association in 2014–2015.
Athalya Brenner-Idan, editorial consultant, is professor emerita of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Chair, Universiteit van Amsterdam, The Netherlands, formerly at the Bible Department, Tel Aviv University, Israël; and now research associate at the Free State University, South Africa.
Elisabeth Schüssler Fiorenza, editorial consultant, author of Ephesians, Krister Stendahl Professor at Harvard University Divinity School, is an internationally known biblical scholar and path-breaking feminist intellectual. She has done pioneering work in biblical interpretation and feminist theology. Dr. Schüssler Fiorenza is the co-founding senior editor of the Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion, was the first woman president of the Society of Biblical Literature, and was elected a member to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2001. Her landmark work, In Memory of Her, has become a classic in biblical studies.
Mary Ann Beavis, editor, co-author of Hebrews, co-author of 2 Thessalonians, has master’s degrees in religious studies and theology from the University of Manitoba and the University of Notre Dame and a PhD in New Testament studies from Cambridge University (UK). She is currently professor of religion and culture at St. Thomas More College, University of Saskatchewan (Saskatoon, Canada). She is the author of several single-author and edited books as well as many peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters, and book reviews. She is the founding editor of the Journal of Religion and Popular Culture.
Carol J. Dempsey, editor, author of Isaiah, is professor of theology (biblical studies) at the University of Portland, Oregon. Her primary research interest is in prophetic literature as it relates to the ancient and contemporary world. Her recent publications include The Bible and Literature (Orbis Books, 2015) and Amos, Hosea, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah: A Commentary (Liturgical Press, 2013) and numerous articles related to prophets, gender studies, ethics, and environmental concerns. She is a member of the Dominican Order of Caldwell, New Jersey.
Lauress Wilkins Lawrence, editor, author of Joel, Obadiah, Jonah, is an African-American Hebrew Bible scholar. She holds an AB from Smith College, and an MDiv and PhD from Boston University. She is the author of The Book of Lamentations and the Social World of Judah in the Neo-Babylonian Era (Gorgias Press, 2010). Previously on the religious studies faculty at Regis College in Weston, Massachusetts, she now balances her time as an independent scholar with her work in philanthropy in Maine.
Amy-Jill Levine, editor, is university professor of New Testament and Jewish Studies, Carpenter Professor of New Testament Studies, and professor of Jewish Studies at Vanderbilt Divinity School and College of Arts and Science; she is also affiliated professor, Centre for the Study of Jewish-Christian Relations, Cambridge, United Kingdom. Her recent publications include The Misunderstood Jew: The Church and the Scandal of the Jewish Jesus (2006) and Short Stories by Jesus: The Enigmatic Parables of a Controversial Rabbi (2014). Dr. Levine is also coeditor of the Jewish Annotated New Testament (2011).
Linda M. Maloney, editor, co-author of Acts of the Apostles, has translated many books including Jesus of Nazareth, No Irrelevant Jesus, and Is This All There Is? all by Gerhard Lohfink, published in English by Liturgical Press. Maloney is also the managing editor of The Bible Today.
Ahida Calderón Pilarski, editor, co-author ofJeremiah, holds a PhD in Hebrew Bible from the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago. She is an associate professor and chair of the Theology Department at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire. Pilarski has written extensively on the intersection of gender and culture/ethnicity/race in the interpretation of the Bible.
Sarah Tanzer, editor, serves as professor of New Testament and Early Judaism at McCormick Theological Seminary in Chicago, Illinois. She has written several essays on feminist interpretation of ancient texts including “Wisdom of Solomon” in Women’s Bible Commentary (3rd edition; 2012) and “Ephesians” in Searching the Scriptures: A Feminist Commentary (1994). Her other research interests have included the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Gospel of John, the historically Jewish Jesus, and most recently, how difference develops in biblical interpretation between Judaism and early Christianity.

Gina Hens-Piazza, editor, author of Lamentations, is the Joseph S. Alemany Professor of Biblical Studies at the Jesuit School of Theology of Santa Clara University, a school within the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, California. Her books include Nameless, Blameless and without Shame: The Tale of Two Cannibal Mothers before a King in the Interfaces series (Liturgical Press, 2006), and Abingdon Old Testament Commentaries: 1 and 2 Kings (Abingdon, 2008). Hens-Piazza is a frequent lecturer nationally and internationally. She received her PhD and MPhil from Union Theological Seminary, New York, and her MA from Vanderbilt University.
PENTATEUCH
Genesis
Irmtraud Fischer, co-author of Genesis, is professor of Old Testament studies at the University of Graz (Austria) and was vice rector for research and continuing education at the university from 2007–2011. She is past president of the European Society of Women in Theological Research and the Association of Catholic Old Testament Researchers in the German Speaking Area. Since 2006, she has served as the German general editor for the international multilingual project Bible and Women, which will be published in 21 volumes and in four languages (www.bibleandwomen.org).
Megan Warner, co-author of Genesis
Exodus
Renate Jost, co-author of Exodus, is the former director of studies at the Anna-Paulsen-House, the Center for Women’s Studies and Education of the Protestant Church of Germany. She is presently professor of theological gender studies and feminist theology at the Augustana Hochschule in Neuendettelsau, as well as director of the International Institute for Feminist Research in Theology and Religion. Her recent book is Feministische Bibelauslegungen: Grundlagen – Forschungsgeschichtliches – Geschlechterperspektiven (IFFTR Befreiende Perspektiven 1; Münster: LIT 2013).
Melanie M. Peetz, co-author of Exodus, is the professor for biblical studies and the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible in Frankfurt and Main, Germany, at Sankt Georgen Graduate School of Philosophy and Theology. In her academic work, she focuses especially on emotions in the Bible and on female characters in the biblical and in the rabbinic literature. Consequently, she has published several books including one on the emotions in Song of Songs, and a textbook about the history of Ancient Israel. Currently she is co-authoring a book on marriage and the family in the Bible.

Leviticus
S. Tamar Kamionkowski, author of Leviticus, is professor of biblical studies at the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College in Wyncote, Pennsylvania, where she served as the vice president for Academic Affairs for almost a decade. She holds a BA from Oberlin College, an MTS from Harvard Divinity School, and a PhD from Brandeis University. Kamionkowski is the author of Gender Reversal and Cosmic Chaos: Studies in the Book of Ezekiel (Sheffield Academic, 2003) and co-editor of Bodies, Embodiment and Theology of the Hebrew Scriptures (T&T Clark, 2010). She serves as co-chair of the SBL's Jewish Interpretation of the Bible session.

Numbers
Jione Havea, author of Numbers, is a native Methodist pastor from Tonga and a research fellow with Trinity Theological College (Aotearoa New Zealand) and the Public and Contextual Theology Research Center of Charles Sturt University (Australia). Jione's research centers around the intersections of Bible, culture (with leanings toward oral and Pasifika cultures), and critical theory, and forthcoming projects include Jonah: An Earth Bible Commentary (Bloomsbury 2020), Vulnerability and Resilience: Body and Liberation Theologies (editor, Lexington 2020) and Reading Ecclesiastes in the Asia-Pasifika (co-editor, SBL 2020).
Deuteronomy
Johanna W H van Wijk-Bos, author of Deuteronomy
HISTORICAL BOOKS
Joshua
Brad Crowell, author of Joshua, is an associate professor in the department of philosophy and religion at Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa. He teaches a wide range of interdisciplinary courses, including several for the Honors Program. His research interests include postcolonial and feminist interpretations in combination with historical critical approaches to the text of the Hebrew Bible. He has authored articles published in the Journal for Ancient Near Eastern Religions, The Bulletin for the American Society of Oriental Research, Zeitschrift für die alttestamentliche Wissenschaft, Currents in Research Biblical Studies, and Biblical Interpretation.
Judges
Mercedes L. García Bachmann, author of Judges, has a PhD in Old Testament from the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago (LSTC). She taught for almost twenty years at the ecumenical school of theology in Buenos Aires (Isedet). She has one published book, Women at Work in the Deuteronomistic History (SBL, 2013), and several articles and book chapters. Currently she directs the Institute for Contextual Pastoral Studies for the United Evangelical Lutheran Church (Argentina-Uruguay) and teaches online for her alma mater and for other schools.
Ruth
Mahri Leonard-Fleckman, co-author of Ruth, is assistant professor of religious studies at the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts. She earned her PhD in 2014 from New York University in Hebrew and Judaic Studies, with a focus on Hebrew Bible and ancient Near Eastern Studies. Before coming to Holy Cross, Leonard-Fleckman was an assistant professor at Providence College, Rhode Island.
Alice Laffey, co-author of Ruth, taught Old Testament for thirty-five years at the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts, before retiring in May 2016. She is the author of many articles as well as Introduction to the Old Testament: A Feminist Perspective (Fortress, 1988), Appreciating God's Creation through Scripture (Paulist, 1997), The Pentateuch: A Liberation-Critical Reading (Fortress, 1998), and 1–2 Kings in the New Collegeville Bible Commentary series (Liturgical Press, 2012).
1 Samuel
Susanne Scholz, author of 1 Samuel, is professor of Old Testament at Perkins School of Theology at Southern Methodist University (SMU) in Dallas, Texas. Among her fourteen books and over sixty essays and journal articles are The Bible as Political Artifact: On the Feminist Study of the Hebrew Bible (Fortress Press, 2017) and Introducing the Women’s Hebrew Bible: Feminism, Gender Justice, and the Study of the Old Testament (second rev. and exp. edn; T&T Clark Bloomsbury, 2017). She also is the editor of the book series Feminist Studies and Sacred Texts (Lexington Books).
2 Samuel
Deirdre Dempsey, author of 2 Samuel
1 Kings
Monica Jyotsna Melanchthon, author of 1 Kings, is a church worker (ordained by the Andhra Evangelical Lutheran Church, India) and theological educator. She currently teaches Hebrew Bible/Old Testament at the Pilgrim Theological College, University of Divinity (Melbourne, Australia) and has published in various academic books focusing on interpretations of Old Testament texts from the Indian context and the perspectives of the marginalized, especially women.
2 Kings
Song-Mi Suzie Park, author of 2 Kings, (PhD, Harvard University, 2010) serves as the associate professor of Old Testament at Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary, where she teaches courses on literary approaches to the biblical text, families, and issues of gender and sexuality. She is the author of Hezekiah and the Dialogue of Memory (Fortress Press, 2015) as well as several articles and essays.
1–2 Chronicles
John Endres, co-author of 1–2 Chronicles, is professor emeritus of Sacred Scripture at the Jesuit School of Theology (in Berkeley) of Santa Clara University. He has authoredBiblical Interpretation in the Book of Jubilees (CBQMS, 1987), Temple, Monarchy, and Word of God (Glazier, 1988), edited Chronicles and Its Synoptic Parallels in Samuel, Kings, and Related Biblical Texts (Liturgical, 1998), and co-authored A Retreat with the Psalms with Elizabeth Liebert, SNJM (Paulist Press, 2001. He holds a PhD and a MA degree from Vanderbilt University, a MDiv from Weston School of Theology, and an AB from the College of the Holy Cross.
Genevive Dibley, co-author of 1–2 Chronicles, (PhD University of California at Berkeley and the Graduate Theological Union) is Director of Religious Studies at Rockford University. She serves as the New Testament editor for Midwest Society of Biblical Literature journal Conversations with the Biblical World and as vice president for the Chicago Society of Biblical Research. She also chairs The Society for the Abolition of Modern-Day Slavery, is a consultant for the Evangelical Covenant Church’s Human Trafficking Taskforce and speaks widely on the on the subject of human trafficking.
Ezra–Nehemiah
Deborah A. Appler, co-author of Ezra-Nehemiah, is professor of Hebrew Bible at Moravian Theological Seminary in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania and an elder in the Eastern Pennsylvania Conference of the United Methodist Church. She has worked extensively and collaboratively on a resource that will be used in the Moravian Church that reads biblical texts to dismantle violence against women. She has also excavated at many sites in Israel/Palestine, including Megiddo and Jezreel, to better understand the Iron and Persian Periods.
Terry Ann Smith, co-author of Ezra-Nehemiah, is the associate dean of institutional assessment and assistant professor of biblical studies at New Brunswick Theological Seminary in New Brunswick, New Jersey. Her research interests and publications focus on inspections of the Hebrew Bible that expose normalized inequitable distributions of power and privilege as these intersect categories of ethnicity, class, and gender. She is particularly interested in contextualized socio-political readings of biblical texts that foster conversations which address the theological, practical, and ethical applications of the Bible by the church. 
Tobit
Michele Murray, author of Tobit
Judith
Jennifer Koosed, co-author of Judith, is professor of religious studies at Albright College in Reading, Pennsylvania. She is the author of several books including (Per)mutations of Qohelet: Reading the Body in the Book (Continuum, 2006); Gleaning Ruth: A Biblical Heroine and Her Afterlives (University of South Carolina, 2011); and Reading the Bible as a Feminist (Brill, 2017). She is also the editor of several works including The Bible and Posthumanism (SBL Press, 2014); and Reading with Feeling: Affect Theory and the Bible (with Fiona C. Black; SBL Press, 2019).
Robert Seesengood, co-author of Judith, is associate dean for first year and general studies and professor of religious studies at Albright College in Reading, Pennsylvania. He received his ThM (New Testament) from Princeton Theological Seminary and his PhD (History of Ancient Christianity) from Drew University. He is a frequent lecturer, an editor, and author of several essays and monographs including Philemon (Bloomsbury, 2017), Paul: A Brief History (Wiley-Blackwell, 2010), and, with Jennifer Koosed, Jesse’s Lineage: The Legendary Lives of David, Jesus and Jesse James (T & T Clark, 2013).
Esther
Jill Middlemas, author of Esther, is currently a researcher with the University of Zurich, Switzerland, and was previously associate professor at Aarhus University in Denmark. She has a PhD from Oxford University where she studied the ideologies of exile and diaspora. She is the author of The Troubles of Templeless Judah (2005), The Templeless Age (2007), and The Divine Image (2014). Her interests span the study of the literature, history, and theology of the biblical and intertestamental worlds, with a particular interest in how historical traditions are reframed in communal memory and mobilized in local communities.
1–2 Maccabees
Kelley Coblentz Bautch, co-author of 1–2 Maccabees
Richard Bautch, co-author of 1–2 Maccabees
PSALMS
Psalms Introduction and Book 1
Beth Tanner, author of Psalms, Introduction and Book 1
Psalms Books 2–3
Denise Dombkowski-Hopkins, author of Psalms, Books 2 and 3, is Woodrow and Mildred Miller Professor of Biblical Theology and Hebrew Bible at Wesley Theological Seminary in Washington, DC. She has authored Journey through the Psalms (Chalice Press, 2002) and (with Michael Koppel) Grounded in the Living Word: The Old Testament and Pastoral Care Practices (Eerdmans, 2010). She and Michael Koppel have co-chaired the Bible and Practical Theology section in the Society of Biblical Literature for six years. The mother of two, she holds PhD and MA degrees from Vanderbilt University and a BA from Syracuse University.
Psalms Books 4–5
Nancy L. deClaisse-Walford, author of Psalms, Books 4 and 5, is the Carolyn Ward Professor of Old Testament and Biblical Languages at the McAfee School of Theology at Mercer University in Atlanta, Georgia. She holds PhD in biblical studies from Baylor University and is the author of several articles and books on the Psalms. deClaisse-Walford is an active participant in and part of the steering committee of The Book of Psalms Section of the Society of Biblical Literature and is also the Old Testament editor for the Word Biblical Commentary series.
WISDOM BOOKS
Job
Valerie Bridgeman, co-author of Hosea, author of Job
Proverbs
Alice Ogden Bellis, author of Proverbs, is an ordained minister and professor of Hebrew Bible at Howard University School of Divinity in Washington, DC. Her books include Helpmates, Harlots, and Heroes: Women's Stories in the Hebrew Bible (Westminster/John Knox, 1994 & 2007), Science, Scripture, and Homosexuality, with Dr. Terry Hufford (Pilgrim Press, 2002; Wipf and Stock, 2011), and Jews and Christians and the Theology of Hebrew Scriptures (co-edited with Joel Kaminsky, SBL Symposium Series; Atlanta: Society of Biblical Literature, November 2000).
Qoheleth (Ecclesiastes)
Lisa Michele Wolfe, author of Qoheleth (Ecclesiastes), is professor of Hebrew Bible, Endowed Chair, at Oklahoma City University (OCU) and also teaches for Saint Paul School of Theology, OCU campus. Lisa is ordained in the United Church of Christ and preaches and teaches regularly in the community and across the country. Her Bible study DVDs, "Uppity Women of the Bible," and companion commentary Ruth, Esther, Song of Songs and Judith, were published in 2010 and 2011, respectively. In 2018 she received the Distinguished Faculty Award for the OCU Honors Program and the University Outstanding Faculty Award.
Song of Songs
F. Scott Spencer author of Song of Songs, (PhD, Durham University, England) has been a professor of biblical studies at Wingate University (North Carolina) and Baptist Theological Seminary at Richmond (Virginia). He has authored several books and numerous articles related to his interests in biblical interpretation, women and the Bible, the Bible and emotion, Song of Songs, and Luke and Acts. He was co-founder and chair of the "Bible and Emotion" group for the Society of Biblical Literature and is former president of the Southeastern Commission for the Study of Religion (SECSOR).
Wisdom of Solomon
Nancy Bowen, author of Wisdom of Solomon, is professor of Old Testament at Earlham School of Religion (Richmond, Indiana). In addition to engaging feminist hermeneutics in all her work, she is most interested in engaging the text in dialogue with other disciplines in ways that intersect with contemporary issues. Her commentary, Ezekiel (Abingdon Old Testament Series), reads Ezekiel through the lens of trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder. Dr. Bowen served as co-chair of the Feminist Hermeneutics of the Bible section and was chair of committee on the Status of Women in the Profession at SBL.
Sirach
J. Laura Manzo, co-author of Sirach, is associate professor of Scripture at St. Thomas University in Houston. She holds a STB in theology and an STL in biblical theology from the Gregorian University. She obtained her PhD in Hebrew Scripture from the Catholic University of America in Washington, DC.
Leah Macinskas-Le, co-author of Sirach, is a PhD student in the department of sacred texts and their interpretation at the Graduate Theological Union in New Testament and Rabbinics. She is writing a dissertation on the rhetoric of Jewish halakhic debates in the Second Temple period, focusing on Sirach, the Gospel of Matthew, and the Dead Sea Scrolls. Leah has a BA in classics and critical theory from McGIll University, a Master of Divinity from Princeton Theological Seminary, and a Master of Arts in Ancient Judaism from the Jewish Theological Seminary of America.
PROPHETS
Isaiah
Carol J. Dempsey, editor, author of Isaiah, is professor of theology (biblical studies) at the University of Portland, Oregon. Her primary research interest is in prophetic literature as it relates to the ancient and contemporary world. Her recent publications include The Bible and Literature (Orbis Books, 2015) and Amos, Hosea, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah: A Commentary (Liturgical Press, 2013) and numerous articles related to prophets, gender studies, ethics, and environmental concerns. She is a member of the Dominican Order of Caldwell, New Jersey.
Jeremiah
Ahida Calderón Pilarski, editor, co-author ofJeremiah, holds a PhD in Hebrew Bible from the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago. She is an associate professor and chair of the Theology Department at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire. Pilarski has written extensively on the intersection of gender and culture/ethnicity/race in the interpretation of the Bible.
Jaime L. Waters, co-author of Jeremiah, is an associate professor in Catholic Studies at DePaul University in Chicago. She holds a PhD from Johns Hopkins University, MA from Yale University, and BA from Boston College. She is the author of Threshing Floors in Ancient Israel: Their Ritual and Symbolic Significance (Fortress Press 2015).

Lamentations
Gina Hens-Piazza, editor, author of Lamentations, is the Joseph S. Alemany Professor of Biblical Studies at the Jesuit School of Theology of Santa Clara University, a school within the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, California. Her books include Nameless, Blameless and without Shame: The Tale of Two Cannibal Mothers before a King in the Interfaces series (Liturgical Press, 2006), and Abingdon Old Testament Commentaries: 1 and 2 Kings (Abingdon, 2008). Hens-Piazza is a frequent lecturer nationally and internationally. She received her PhD and MPhil from Union Theological Seminary, New York, and her MA from Vanderbilt University.
Baruch and the Letter of Jeremiah
Marie-Theres Wacker, author of Baruch and the Letter of Jeremiah, professor of Old Testament and women's research at the Faculty of Catholic Theology, University of Muenster, Germany. She is director of the Seminar for Old Testament Exegesis and runs a research unit for gender studies in theology. Her fields of teaching, research, and publication include feminist biblical hermeneutics, biblical monotheism, early Jewish writings from Hellenistic times, and reception history of the Bible. Together with Luise Schottroff, she edited Feminist Biblical Interpretation: A Compendium, a feminist commentary on the Christian Bible and selected noncanonical writings.
Ezekiel
Corrine Carvalho, author of Ezekiel
Daniel
Carolyn Leeb, author of Daniel, ordained in the PC(USA), was a lecturer in theology and chair of gender studies at Valparaiso University. As an avid runner and mother of six, she earned her BS in chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a MDiv from San Francisco Theological, and a MTh and a PhD from Lutheran School of Theology in Chicago. Her recent publications include Away from the Father's House: The Social Location of Na'ar and Na'arah in Ancient Israel (Sheffield: Sheffield Academic, 2000).
Hosea
Cheryl A. Kirk-Duggan, co-author of Hosea, is Visiting Black Religious Scholar and Crump Professor, (2019-2020) at the Seminary of the Southwest in Austin, Texas, and an ordained clergy member in the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church. She has written and edited over twenty-five books and numerous articles and book chapters. Since 2004, she has been professor of religion, and director of women’s studies, at Shaw University Divinity School in Raleigh, North Carolina.
Valerie Bridgeman, co-author of Hosea, author of Job
Amos
Janice P. De-Whyte, author of Amos, is assistant professor of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament at the School of Religion, Loma Linda University, California. She has authored Wom(b)an: A Cultural-Narrative Reading of The Hebrew Bible Barrenness Narratives (Brill, 2018). She also contributed a chapter, “The Reproductive Rite,” in The Bible and Feminism: Remapping The Field (Oxford University Press, 2017). Her research interests include women in the Bible, prophetic literature, as well as cultural and socio-economic interpretations of the Bible. Dr. De-Whyte has studied and graduated from Newbold College (Bachelor of Divinity), Andrews University (MA Old Testament) and McMaster Divinity College (PhD Old Testament).
Joel, Obadiah, Jonah
Lauress Wilkins Lawrence, editor, author of Joel, Obadiah, Jonah, is an African-American Hebrew Bible scholar. She holds an AB from Smith College, and an MDiv and PhD from Boston University. She is the author of The Book of Lamentations and the Social World of Judah in the Neo-Babylonian Era (Gorgias Press, 2010). Previously on the religious studies faculty at Regis College in Weston, Massachusetts, she now balances her time as an independent scholar with her work in philanthropy in Maine.
Micah
Julia O'Brien, author of Micah, is Paul H. and Grace L. Stern Professor of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament at Lancaster Theological Seminary in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. She is editor in chief of the Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and Gender Studies (2014), and her other publications include Challenging Prophetic Metaphor (Westminster John Knox, 2008); Nahum through Malachi (Abingdon Old Testament Commentary series, 2004); Nahum (Sheffield Academic Press, 2002; 2nd ed. 2009); andPriest and Levite in Malachi (Society of Biblical Literature Dissertation Series, 1990). She holds PhD and MDiv degrees from Duke University and a BA from Wake Forest University.
Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah
Wilda C. M. Gafney, author of Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, is an associate professor of Hebrew Bible at Brite Divinity School where she prepares students undertaking a first master's degree in religion seeking to serve in a variety of social and ecclesial settings, and students seeking the PhD in Hebrew biblical studies. She is the recipient of the Catherine Saylor Hill Faculty Excellence award. Dr. Gafney is the author of Daughters of Miriam: Women Prophets in Ancient Israel and Womanist Midrash: A ReIntroduction to the Women of the Torah and the Throne.
Haggai and Malachi
Stacy Davis, author of Haggai and Malachi, (PhD, University of Notre Dame, 2003) is associate professor of religious studies and chair of gender and women's studies at Saint Mary's College, Notre Dame, Indiana. She teaches courses in religious conversion, Jewish and Christian interpretation of the Hebrew Bible, Torah, and Prophets.
Zechariah
Leslie Hoppe, co-author of Zechariah, is the Carroll Stuhlmueller Distinguished Professor of Old Testament Studies at Catholic Theological Union (Chicago). He is the general editor of The Catholic Biblical Quarterly and has served on the editorial boards of Old Testament Abstracts and The Bible Today and was the general editor of the latter. He has served as the President of the Chicago Society of Biblical Research and the Catholic Biblical Association of America. Fr. Hoppe has been a brother in the Assumption Province, Order of Friars Minor (Franciscans) since 1962 and a Roman Catholic priest since 1971.
Malka Zeiger Simkovich, co-author of Zechariah, is the Crown-Ryan Chair of Jewish Studies and the director of the Catholic-Jewish Studies program at Catholic Theological Union in Chicago. She earned a doctoral degree in Second Temple and Rabbinic Judaism from Brandeis University and a MA in Hebrew Bible from Harvard University. Her first book, The Making of Jewish Universalism: From Exile to Alexandria was published in 2016, and her second book, Discovering Second Temple Literature: The Scriptures and Stories That Shaped Early Judaism, was published in 2018.
GOSPELS & ACTS
Matthew
Celia Deutsch, author of Matthew
Mark
Warren Carter, author ofMark, is the LaDonna Kramer Meinders Professor of New Testament at Phillips Theological Seminary in Tulsa, Oklahoma. He is the author of eighteen books and is a regular presenter at scholarly conferences and in church contexts.
Luke
Barbara E. Reid, general editor, co-author of Luke, is a Dominican Sister of Grand Rapids, Michigan. She holds a PhD in biblical studies from The Catholic University of America and is professor of New Testament studies at Catholic Theological Union, Chicago. Her most recent publications areWisdom’s Feast: An Invitation to Feminist Interpretation of the Scriptures (2016) and Abiding Word: Sunday Reflections on Year A, B, C (3 vols.; 2011, 2012, 2013). She served as vice president and academic dean at CTU from 2009 to 2018 and as president of the Catholic Biblical Association in 2014–2015.
Shelly Matthews, co-author of Luke, is the series editor for the SBL Press series Early Christianity and Its Literature; and co-editor of the Feminist Studies in Religion Book Series, FSRBooks. She is the author of Perfect Martyr: The Stoning of Stephen and the Construction of Christian Identity (Oxford University Press), and The Acts of the Apostles: Introduction and Study Guide: Taming the Tongues of Fire (T&T Clark).
John
Mary Coloe, author of John, associate professor in New Testament at Yarra Theological Union in Melbourne. Mary taught for over 20 years at Australian Catholic University, and also at Boston College, the Jesuit School of Theology in Berkeley and in Jerusalem. Mary has many academic publications on the Gospel of John, as well as books to help parents and teachers such as, A Friendly Guide to John, The Two Hands of God, and A Friendly Guide to the Birth of Jesus. Mary has also written an introduction to the Johannine Literature for a new edition of the Jerome Biblical Commentary.
Acts of the Apostles
Linda M. Maloney, editor, co-author of Acts of the Apostles, has translated many books including Jesus of Nazareth, No Irrelevant Jesus, and Is This All There Is? all by Gerhard Lohfink, published in English by Liturgical Press. Maloney is also the managing editor of The Bible Today.
Ivoni Richter Reimer, co-author of Acts of the Apostles
LETTERS & REVELATION
Romans
Christian A. Eberhart, author of Romans, is professor of religious studies at the University of Houston, Texas. He is also Director of the Religious Studies Program and former Chair of the Department of Comparative Cultural Studies at this university. His books include Kultmetaphorik und Christologie: Opfer- und Sühneterminologie im Neuen Testament (2013), What a Difference a Meal Makes: The Last Supper in the Bible and in the Christian Church (2016), Sacrifice, Cult, and Atonement in Early Judaism and Christianity: Constituents and Critique (co-edited with H.L. Wiley, 2017), andThe Sacrifice of Jesus: Understanding Atonement Biblically (second ed. 2018).
1 Corinthians
Mary R. D'Angelo, author of 1 Corinthians, associate professor at the University of Notre Dame (emerita), has taught Christian origins and women’s/gender studies in a number of institutions in the US and Canada, including Maryknoll School of Theology and Toronto School of Theology. With Ross S. Kraemer, she edited Women and Christian Origins (New York: Oxford University Press, 1999); she lectures and publishes on women, gender, and imperial politics in the beginnings of Christianity. Her particular concerns are with the representation of ancient Judaism and with the intersection of gender and enslavement in ancient ethical assumptions.
2 Corinthians
Antoinette Wire, author of 2 Corinthians, is Robert S. Dollar Professor Emerita of New Testament Studies at San Francisco Theological Seminary and the Graduate Theological Union where she taught since 1973. Dr. Wire is a graduate of Yale Divinity and Claremont Graduate School. Raised in China by missionary parents, she has lived her adult life largely in California.
Galatians
Brigitte Kahl, author of Galatians, teaches New Testament at Union Theological Seminary in New York. A native of East Germany and ordained pastor, she taught ecumenical bible studies and New Testament at Humboldt University in Berlin between 1989 and 1997. A major focus of her work has been on Critical Re-imagination (CRI) of Paul and justification theology through an eco-feminist and empire-critical lens, with a strong emphasis on Roman imperial iconography. She has published extensively both in English and German.
Ephesians
Elisabeth Schüssler Fiorenza, editorial consultant, author of Ephesians, Krister Stendahl Professor at Harvard University Divinity School, is an internationally known biblical scholar and path-breaking feminist intellectual. She has done pioneering work in biblical interpretation and feminist theology. Dr. Schüssler Fiorenza is the co-founding senior editor of the Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion, was the first woman president of the Society of Biblical Literature, and was elected a member to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2001. Her landmark work, In Memory of Her, has become a classic in biblical studies.
Philippians, Colossians, Philemon
Elsa Tamez, author of Philippians, is a Mexican-Costarrican New Testament biblical scholar. She is a member of the Methodist church and is professor emerita and former rector of the Latin American Biblical University. She earned her ThD at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland. Her most recent publications include Struggles for Power in Early Christianity (2007); No discriminen a los pobres. Lectura de Santiago (2008); El Nuevo Testamento, Palabra por Palabra, interlineal griego-español (2012).
Cynthia Briggs Kittredge, co-author of Colossians, is dean and president and professor of New Testament at Seminary of the Southwest in Austin, Texas. She is a contributor to The New Oxford Annotated Bible and Women's Bible Commentary, and the author of Conversations with Scripture: The Gospel of John and Community and Authority: The Rhetoric of Obedience in the Pauline Tradition. Most recently, she is the co-editor of The Fortress Commentary on the Bible: The New Testament (2014) and author of A Lot of the Way Trees Were Walking: Poems from the Gospel of Mark (2015).
Claire Miller Colombo, co-author of Colossians, is director of the Center for Writing and Creative Expression at Seminary of the Southwest, where she also teaches in the areas of theopoetics, theology and literature, and writing. Her articles on English Romantic poetry and drama appear in Studies in Romanticism and Texas Studies in Literature and Language. She is literary co-editor of Theopoetics: A Journal of Theological Imagination, Literature, Embodiment, and Aesthetics and editor of the literary and arts journal Soul by Southwest.
Alicia Batten, author of Philemon, is associate professor of religious studies and theology at Conrad Grebel University College at the University of Waterloo. She is the author of Friendship and Benefaction in James (ESEC 15; Deo, 2010) and What Are they Saying about the Letter of James (Paulist, 2009); she is co-editor (with Carly Daniel-Hughes and Kristi Upson-Saia) of Dressing Judeans and Christians in Antiquity (Ashgate, 2014) and (with John S. Kloppenborg) James, 1 and 2 Peter, and Early Jesus Traditions (T&T Clark/Bloomsbury, 2014).
1–2 Thessalonians
Florence Gillman, author of 1 Thessalonians, is professor of biblical studies, coordinator of the Classical Studies Program, and former chair of the Department of Theology and Religious Studies at the University of San Diego. Following completion of her BA and MA at The Catholic University of America, she received her STL, PhD, and STD from the Katholieke Universiteit te Leuven (Belgium). The author of numerous books and articles, she is especially interested in the Pauline churches, women in early Christianity, and the world behind the text of New Testament literature.
Mary Ann Beavis, editor, co-author of Hebrews, co-author of 2 Thessalonians, has master’s degrees in religious studies and theology from the University of Manitoba and the University of Notre Dame and a PhD in New Testament studies from Cambridge University (UK). She is currently professor of religion and culture at St. Thomas More College, University of Saskatchewan (Saskatoon, Canada). She is the author of several single-author and edited books as well as many peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters, and book reviews. She is the founding editor of the Journal of Religion and Popular Culture.
HyeRan Kim-Cragg, co-author of 2 Thessalonians, co-author of Hebrews, is associate professor of preaching at Emmanuel College, Toronto, Canada. As a practical theologian, her main areas of teaching are religious education and worship. Influenced by postcolonial theory, feminist theology, and migration, her most recent book is The Encounters: Retelling the Bible from Migration and Intercultural Perspectives, co-authored with EunYoung Choi. Her most recent articles appear in Liturgy in Postcolonial Perspectives, Church in the Age of Migration: A Moving Body, and the journal Religious Education.
1–2 Timothy, Titus
Annette Bourland Huizenga, author of 1–2 Timothy, Titus, serves as dean of the seminary and associate professor of New Testament at the University of Dubuque Theological Seminary (Dubuque, Iowa). Her research interests include the Pauline letters and communities, women in the early church, households in the Roman Empire, and ancient moral-philosophical education. She has written several articles about the expectations for women’s behavior, clothing, and virtues in the ancient world. In 2015, the University of Dubuque awarded Dr. Huizenga with the William L. Lomax Award for excellence in Teaching and Advising.
Hebrews
Mary Ann Beavis, editor, co-author of Hebrews, co-author of 2 Thessalonians, has master’s degrees in religious studies and theology from the University of Manitoba and the University of Notre Dame and a PhD in New Testament studies from Cambridge University (UK). She is currently professor of religion and culture at St. Thomas More College, University of Saskatchewan (Saskatoon, Canada). She is the author of several single-author and edited books as well as many peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters, and book reviews. She is the founding editor of the Journal of Religion and Popular Culture.
HyeRan Kim-Cragg, co-author of 2 Thessalonians, co-author of Hebrews, is associate professor of preaching at Emmanuel College, Toronto, Canada. As a practical theologian, her main areas of teaching are religious education and worship. Influenced by postcolonial theory, feminist theology, and migration, her most recent book is The Encounters: Retelling the Bible from Migration and Intercultural Perspectives, co-authored with EunYoung Choi. Her most recent articles appear inLiturgy in Postcolonial Perspectives, Church in the Age of Migration: A Moving Body, and the journal Religious Education.
James
Holly E. Hearon, co-author of James, is the T.J. and Virginia Liggett Professor of Christian Traditions and New Testament Emerita at Christian Theological Seminary (Indianapolis). Her research interests include the role and representation of women in the period of Christian origins, social memory in the formation of community identity and praxis, and multimodal communications system in the worlds of the New Testament. She is the author of The Mary Magdalene Tradition: Witness and Counter-Witness in Early Christian Communities, as well as numerous book chapters and journal articles.
Débora Junker, co-author of James, is assistant professor of Christian education at the Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary in Evanston, Illinois, where she directs the Hispanic-Latinx Center and the Cátedra Paulo Freire. Her areas of interest and writings range from Paulo Freire's work, critical pedagogy, decolonial studies, and liberation theologies.
1–2 Peter, Jude
Pheme Perkins, author of 1 Peter
Eloise Rosenblatt, author of 2 Peter, is a Sister of Mercy, a theologian and attorney in private practice in family law in California. She holds an MA in comparative literature from the University of Southern California and a PhD from the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley. She was the first US woman admitted to the graduate program at the École Biblique et Archaéologique Française in Jerusalem, Israel in 1981. She is editor-author of Where Can We Find Her? Searching for Women’s Identity in the New Church (Paulist, 1991) and Paul the Accused: His Portrait in Acts (Glazier-Liturgical Press: 1995). Among other scholarly articles, she authored entries on Jude and 2 Peter in Schüssler-Fiorenza’s anthology Searching the Scriptures (Crossroad, 1994).
Patricia McDonald, author of Jude, a member of the Society of the Holy Child Jesus, is currently Academic Program Director and teacher of New Testament at the Pontifical Beda College, Rome, where she has been since 2012. She has degrees from Cambridge and London Universities, the Pontifical Biblical Institute and the Catholic University of America. She has taught at Mount St Mary’s College (now University), Emmitsburg, Maryland, and at Ushaw College, Durham, England. Her publications include God and Violence: Biblical Resources for Living in a Small World (Herald Press, 2004), and articles on a variety of New Testament and related topics.
1–2–3 John
Leticia A. Guardiola-Sáenz, author of 1–2–3 John, is associate professor of Christian Scriptures at the School of Theology and Ministry at Seattle University. She previously taught at Drew University and at Andover Newton Theological School. Born and raised in the borderlands between Mexico and the United States, Leticia’s experience of borders and bridges—of diversity and hybridity—has shaped both her life and her critical lenses for interpreting the Bible. She has been very active with the Hispanic Summer Program and the Hispanic Theological Initiative, teaching and mentoring the next generation of Latinx Bible scholars/ministers. She earned her PhD in New Testament from Vanderbilt University.
Revelation
Lynn R. Huber, author of Revelation, is professor of religious studies and Director of Honors at Elon University in North Carolina. She is the author of two books on Revelation, “Like a Bride Adorned:” Reading Metaphor in John’s Apocalypse (2007) and Thinking and Seeing with Women in Revelation (2013), and co-editor with Dr. Rhiannon Graybill on an anthology of critical readings on gender, sex, and sexuality and the Bible. Much of her work on Revelation explores the book’s use of gendered imagery, especially as it intersects with historical perspectives on gender and sex. She is also exploring the ways Revelation has been engaged by LGBTQ+ readers and communities.
 
Deborah Appler
Deborah A. Appler, co-author of Ezra-Nehemiah, is professor of Hebrew Bible at Moravian Theological Seminary in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania and an elder in the Eastern Pennsylvania Conference of the United Methodist Church. She has worked extensively and collaboratively on a resource that will be used in the Moravian Church that reads biblical texts to dismantle violence against women. She has also excavated at many sites in Israel/Palestine, including Megiddo and Jezreel, to better understand the Iron and Persian Periods.
Alicia Batten, author of Philemon, is associate professor of religious studies and theology at Conrad Grebel University College at the University of Waterloo. She is the author of Friendship and Benefaction in James (ESEC 15; Deo, 2010) and What Are they Saying about the Letter of James (Paulist, 2009); she is co-editor (with Carly Daniel-Hughes and Kristi Upson-Saia) of Dressing Judeans and Christians in Antiquity (Ashgate, 2014) and (with John S. Kloppenborg) James, 1 and 2 Peter, and Early Jesus Traditions (T&T Clark/Bloomsbury, 2014).
Richard Bautch, co-author of 1-2 Maccabees
Mary Ann Beavis
Mary Ann Beavis, editor, co-author of Hebrews, co-author of 2 Thessalonians, has master’s degrees in religious studies and theology from the University of Manitoba and the University of Notre Dame and a PhD in New Testament studies from Cambridge University (UK). She is currently professor of religion and culture at St. Thomas More College, University of Saskatchewan (Saskatoon, Canada). She is the author of several single-author and edited books as well as many peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters, and book reviews. She is the founding editor of the Journal of Religion and Popular Culture.
Alice Ogden Bellis, author of Proverbs, is an ordained minister and professor of Hebrew Bible at Howard University School of Divinity in Washington, D.C. Her books include Helpmates, Harlots, and Heroes: Women's Stories in the Hebrew Bible (Westminster/John Knox, 1994 & 2007), Science, Scripture, and Homosexuality, with Dr. Terry Hufford (Pilgrim Press, 2002; Wipf and Stock, 2011), and Jews and Christians and the Theology of Hebrew Scriptures (co-edited with Joel Kaminsky, SBL Symposium Series; Atlanta: Society of Biblical Literature, November 2000).
Annette Bourland Huizenga
Annette Bourland Huizenga, author of 1–2 Timothy, Titus, serves as dean of the seminary and associate professor of New Testament at the University of Dubuque Theological Seminary (Dubuque, Iowa). Her research interests include the Pauline letters and communities, women in the early church, households in the Roman Empire, and ancient moral-philosophical education. She has written several articles about the expectations for women’s behavior, clothing, and virtues in the ancient world. In 2015, the University of Dubuque awarded Dr. Huizenga with the William L. Lomax Award for excellence in Teaching and Advising.
Nancy Bowen
Nancy Bowen, author of Wisdom of Solomon, is professor of Old Testament at Earlham School of Religion (Richmond, Indiana). In addition to engaging feminist hermeneutics in all her work, she is most interested in engaging the text in dialogue with other disciplines in ways that intersect with contemporary issues. Her commentary, Ezekiel (Abingdon Old Testament Series), reads Ezekiel through the lens of trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder. Dr. Bowen served as co-chair of the Feminist Hermeneutics of the Bible section and was chair of committee on the Status of Women in the Profession at SBL.
Athalya Brenner-Idan, editorial consultant, is professor emerita of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Chair, Universiteit van Amsterdam, The Netherlands, formerly at the Bible Department, Tel Aviv University, Israël; and now research associate at the Free State University, South Africa.
Valerie Bridgeman, co-author of Hosea, author of Job
Warren Carter, author ofMark, is the LaDonna Kramer Meinders Professor of New Testament at Phillips Theological Seminary in Tulsa, Oklahoma. He is the author of eighteen books and is a regular presenter at scholarly conferences and in church contexts.
Corrine Carvalho, author of Ezekiel
Kelley Coblentz Bautch, co-author of 1–2 Maccabees
Mary Coloe, author of John, associate professor in New Testament at Yarra Theological Union in Melbourne. Mary taught for over 20 years at Australian Catholic University, and also at Boston College, the Jesuit School of Theology in Berkeley and in Jerusalem. Mary has many academic publications on the Gospel of John, as well as books to help parents and teachers such as, A Friendly Guide to John, The Two Hands of God, and A Friendly Guide to the Birth of Jesus. Mary has also written an introduction to the Johannine Literature for a new edition of the Jerome Biblical Commentary.
Claire Miller Colombo, co-author of Colossians, is director of the Center for Writing and Creative Expression at Seminary of the Southwest, where she also teaches in the areas of theopoetics, theology and literature, and writing. Her articles on English Romantic poetry and drama appear in Studies in Romanticism and Texas Studies in Literature and Language. She is literary co-editor of Theopoetics: A Journal of Theological Imagination, Literature, Embodiment, and Aesthetics and editor of the literary and arts journal Soul by Southwest.
Brad Crowell, author of Joshua, is an associate professor in the department of philosophy and religion at Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa. He teaches a wide range of interdisciplinary courses, including several for the Honors Program. His research interests include postcolonial and feminist interpretations in combination with historical critical approaches to the text of the Hebrew Bible. He has authored articles published in the Journal for Ancient Near Eastern Religions, The Bulletin for the American Society of Oriental Research, Zeitschrift für die alttestamentliche Wissenschaft, Currents in Research Biblical Studies, and Biblical Interpretation.
Mary R. D'Angelo, author of 1 Corinthians, associate professor at the University of Notre Dame (emerita), has taught Christian origins and women’s/gender studies in a number of institutions in the US and Canada, including Maryknoll School of Theology and Toronto School of Theology. With Ross S. Kraemer, she edited Women and Christian Origins (New York: Oxford University Press, 1999); she lectures and publishes on women, gender, and imperial politics in the beginnings of Christianity. Her particular concerns are with the representation of ancient Judaism and with the intersection of gender and enslavement in ancient ethical assumptions.
Stacy Davis, author of Haggai and Malachi, (PhD, University of Notre Dame, 2003) is associate professor of religious studies and chair of gender and women's studies at Saint Mary's College, Notre Dame, Indiana. She teaches courses in religious conversion, Jewish and Christian interpretation of the Hebrew Bible, Torah, and Prophets.
Nancy L. deClaisse-Walford, author of Psalms, Books 4 and 5, is the Carolyn Ward Professor of Old Testament and Biblical Languages at the McAfee School of Theology at Mercer University in Atlanta, Georgia. She holds PhD in biblical studies from Baylor University and is the author of several articles and books on the Psalms. deClaisse-Walford is an active participant in and part of the steering committee of The Book of Psalms Section of the Society of Biblical Literature and is also the Old Testament editor for the Word Biblical Commentary series.
Carol J. Dempsey, editor, author of Isaiah, is professor of theology (biblical studies) at the University of Portland, Oregon. Her primary research interest is in prophetic literature as it relates to the ancient and contemporary world. Her recent publications include The Bible and Literature (Orbis Books, 2015) and Amos, Hosea, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah: A Commentary (Liturgical Press, 2013) and numerous articles related to prophets, gender studies, ethics, and environmental concerns. She is a member of the Dominican Order of Caldwell, New Jersey.
Deirdre Dempsey, author of 2 Samuel
Celia Deutsch, author of Matthew
Janice P. De-Whyte, author of Amos, is assistant professor of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament at the School of Religion, Loma Linda University, California. She has authored Wom(b)an: A Cultural-Narrative Reading of The Hebrew Bible Barrenness Narratives (Brill, 2018). She also contributed a chapter, “The Reproductive Rite,” in The Bible and Feminism: Remapping The Field (Oxford University Press, 2017). Her research interests include women in the Bible, prophetic literature, as well as cultural and socio-economic interpretations of the Bible. Dr. De-Whyte has studied and graduated from Newbold College (Bachelor of Divinity), Andrews University (MA Old Testament) and McMaster Divinity College (PhD Old Testament).
Genevive Dibley, co-author of 1–2 Chronicles, (PhD University of California at Berkeley and the Graduate Theological Union) is Director of Religious Studies at Rockford University. She serves as the New Testament editor for Midwest Society of Biblical Literature journal Conversations with the Biblical World and as vice president for the Chicago Society of Biblical Research. She also chairs The Society for the Abolition of Modern-Day Slavery, is a consultant for the Evangelical Covenant Church’s Human Trafficking Taskforce and speaks widely on the on the subject of human trafficking.
Denise Dombkowski-Hopkins, author of Psalms, Books 2 and 3, is Woodrow and Mildred Miller Professor of Biblical Theology and Hebrew Bible at Wesley Theological Seminary in Washington, DC. She has authored Journey through the Psalms (Chalice Press, 2002) and (with Michael Koppel) Grounded in the Living Word: The Old Testament and Pastoral Care Practices (Eerdmans, 2010). She and Michael Koppel have co-chaired the Bible and Practical Theology section in the Society of Biblical Literature for six years. The mother of two, she holds PhD and MA degrees from Vanderbilt University and a BA from Syracuse University.
Christian A. Eberhart, author of Romans, is professor of religious studies at the University of Houston, Texas. He is also Director of the Religious Studies Program and former Chair of the Department of Comparative Cultural Studies at this university. His books include Kultmetaphorik und Christologie: Opfer- und Sühneterminologie im Neuen Testament (2013), What a Difference a Meal Makes: The Last Supper in the Bible and in the Christian Church (2016), Sacrifice, Cult, and Atonement in Early Judaism and Christianity: Constituents and Critique (co-edited with H.L. Wiley, 2017), andThe Sacrifice of Jesus: Understanding Atonement Biblically (second ed. 2018).
John Endres, co-author of 1–2 Chronicles, is professor emeritus of Sacred Scripture at the Jesuit School of Theology (in Berkeley) of Santa Clara University. He has authoredBiblical Interpretation in the Book of Jubilees (CBQMS, 1987), Temple, Monarchy, and Word of God (Glazier, 1988), edited Chronicles and Its Synoptic Parallels in Samuel, Kings, and Related Biblical Texts (Liturgical, 1998), and co-authored A Retreat with the Psalms with Elizabeth Liebert, SNJM (Paulist Press, 2001. He holds a PhD and a MA degree from Vanderbilt University, a MDiv from Weston School of Theology, and an AB from the College of the Holy Cross.
Irmtraud Fischer, co-author of Genesis, is professor of Old Testament studies at the University of Graz (Austria) and was vice rector for research and continuing education at the university from 2007–2011. She is past president of the European Society of Women in Theological Research and the Association of Catholic Old Testament Researchers in the German Speaking Area. Since 2006, she has served as the German general editor for the international multilingual project Bible and Women, which will be published in 21 volumes and in four languages (www.bibleandwomen.org).
Wilda C. M. Gafney, author of Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, is an associate professor of Hebrew Bible at Brite Divinity School where she prepares students undertaking a first master's degree in religion seeking to serve in a variety of social and ecclesial settings, and students seeking the PhD in Hebrew biblical studies. She is the recipient of the Catherine Saylor Hill Faculty Excellence award. Dr. Gafney is the author of Daughters of Miriam: Women Prophets in Ancient Israel and Womanist Midrash: A ReIntroduction to the Women of the Torah and the Throne.
Mercedes L. García Bachmann, author of Judges, has a PhD in Old Testament from the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago (LSTC). She taught for almost twenty years at the ecumenical school of theology in Buenos Aires (Isedet). She has one published book, Women at Work in the Deuteronomistic History (SBL, 2013), and several articles and book chapters. Currently she directs the Institute for Contextual Pastoral Studies for the United Evangelical Lutheran Church (Argentina-Uruguay) and teaches online for her alma mater and for other schools.
Florence Gillman, author of 1 Thessalonians, is professor of biblical studies, coordinator of the Classical Studies Program, and former chair of the Department of Theology and Religious Studies at the University of San Diego. Following completion of her BA and MA at The Catholic University of America, she received her STL, PhD, and STD from the Katholieke Universiteit te Leuven (Belgium). The author of numerous books and articles, she is especially interested in the Pauline churches, women in early Christianity, and the world behind the text of New Testament literature.
Leticia A. Guardiola-Sáenz, author of 1–2–3 John, is associate professor of Christian Scriptures at the School of Theology and Ministry at Seattle University. She previously taught at Drew University and at Andover Newton Theological School. Born and raised in the borderlands between Mexico and the United States, Leticia’s experience of borders and bridges—of diversity and hybridity—has shaped both her life and her critical lenses for interpreting the Bible. She has been very active with the Hispanic Summer Program and the Hispanic Theological Initiative, teaching and mentoring the next generation of Latinx Bible scholars/ministers. She earned her PhD in New Testament from Vanderbilt University.
Jione Havea, author of Numbers, is a native Methodist pastor from Tonga and a research fellow with Trinity Theological College (Aotearoa New Zealand) and the Public and Contextual Theology Research Center of Charles Sturt University (Australia). Jione's research centers around the intersections of Bible, culture (with leanings toward oral and Pasifika cultures), and critical theory, and forthcoming projects include Jonah: An Earth Bible Commentary (Bloomsbury 2020), Vulnerability and Resilience: Body and Liberation Theologies (editor, Lexington 2020) and Reading Ecclesiastes in the Asia-Pasifika (co-editor, SBL 2020).
Holly E. Hearon, co-author of James, is the T.J. and Virginia Liggett Professor of Christian Traditions and New Testament Emerita at Christian Theological Seminary (Indianapolis). Her research interests include the role and representation of women in the period of Christian origins, social memory in the formation of community identity and praxis, and multimodal communications system in the worlds of the New Testament. She is the author of The Mary Magdalene Tradition: Witness and Counter-Witness in Early Christian Communities, as well as numerous book chapters and journal articles.
Gina Hens-Piazza, editor, author of Lamentations, is the Joseph S. Alemany Professor of Biblical Studies at the Jesuit School of Theology of Santa Clara University, a school within the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, California. Her books include Nameless, Blameless and without Shame: The Tale of Two Cannibal Mothers before a King in the Interfaces series (Liturgical Press, 2006), and Abingdon Old Testament Commentaries: 1 and 2 Kings (Abingdon, 2008). Hens-Piazza is a frequent lecturer nationally and internationally. She received her PhD and MPhil from Union Theological Seminary, New York, and her MA from Vanderbilt University.
Leslie Hoppe, co-author of Zechariah, is the Carroll Stuhlmueller Distinguished Professor of Old Testament Studies at Catholic Theological Union (Chicago). He is the general editor of The Catholic Biblical Quarterly and has served on the editorial boards of Old Testament Abstracts and The Bible Today and was the general editor of the latter. He has served as the President of the Chicago Society of Biblical Research and the Catholic Biblical Association of America. Fr. Hoppe has been a brother in the Assumption Province, Order of Friars Minor (Franciscans) since 1962 and a Roman Catholic priest since 1971.
Lynn R. Huber, author of Revelation, is professor of religious studies and Director of Honors at Elon University in North Carolina. She is the author of two books on Revelation, “Like a Bride Adorned:” Reading Metaphor in John’s Apocalypse (2007) and Thinking and Seeing with Women in Revelation (2013), and co-editor with Dr. Rhiannon Graybill on an anthology of critical readings on gender, sex, and sexuality and the Bible. Much of her work on Revelation explores the book’s use of gendered imagery, especially as it intersects with historical perspectives on gender and sex. She is also exploring the ways Revelation has been engaged by LGBTQ+ readers and communities.
Renate Jost, co-author of Exodus, is the former director of studies at the Anna-Paulsen-House, the Center for Women’s Studies and Education of the Protestant Church of Germany. She is presently professor of theological gender studies and feminist theology at the Augustana Hochschule in Neuendettelsau, as well as director of the International Institute for Feminist Research in Theology and Religion. Her recent book is Feministische Bibelauslegungen: Grundlagen – Forschungsgeschichtliches – Geschlechterperspektiven (IFFTR Befreiende Perspektiven 1; Münster: LIT 2013).
Débora Junker, co-author of James, is assistant professor of Christian education at the Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary in Evanston, Illinois, where she directs the Hispanic-Latinx Center and the Cátedra Paulo Freire. Her areas of interest and writings range from Paulo Freire's work, critical pedagogy, decolonial studies, and liberation theologies.
Brigitte Kahl, author of Galatians, teaches New Testament at Union Theological Seminary in New York. A native of East Germany and ordained pastor, she taught ecumenical bible studies and New Testament at Humboldt University in Berlin between 1989 and 1997. A major focus of her work has been on Critical Re-imagination (CRI) of Paul and justification theology through an eco-feminist and empire-critical lens, with a strong emphasis on Roman imperial iconography. She has published extensively both in English and German.
S. Tamar Kamionkowski, author of Leviticus, is professor of biblical studies at the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College in Wyncote, Pennsylvania, where she served as the vice president for Academic Affairs for almost a decade. She holds a BA from Oberlin College, an MTS from Harvard Divinity School, and a PhD from Brandeis University. Kamionkowski is the author of Gender Reversal and Cosmic Chaos: Studies in the Book of Ezekiel (Sheffield Academic, 2003) and co-editor of Bodies, Embodiment and Theology of the Hebrew Scriptures (T&T Clark, 2010). She serves as co-chair of the SBL's Jewish Interpretation of the Bible session.

HyeRan Kim-Cragg, co-author of 2 Thessalonians, co-author of Hebrews, is associate professor of preaching at Emmanuel College, Toronto, Canada. As a practical theologian, her main areas of teaching are religious education and worship. Influenced by postcolonial theory, feminist theology, and migration, her most recent book is The Encounters: Retelling the Bible from Migration and Intercultural Perspectives, co-authored with EunYoung Choi. Her most recent articles appear in Liturgy in Postcolonial Perspectives, Church in the Age of Migration: A Moving Body, and the journal Religious Education.
Cheryl A. Kirk-Duggan, co-author of Hosea, is Visiting Black Religious Scholar and Crump Professor, (2019-2020) at the Seminary of the Southwest in Austin, Texas, and an ordained clergy member in the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church. She has written and edited over twenty-five books and numerous articles and book chapters. Since 2004, she has been professor of religion, and director of women’s studies, at Shaw University Divinity School in Raleigh, North Carolina.
Cynthia Briggs Kittredge, co-author of Colossians, is dean and president and professor of New Testament at Seminary of the Southwest in Austin, Texas. She is a contributor to The New Oxford Annotated Bible and Women's Bible Commentary, and the author of Conversations with Scripture: The Gospel of John and Community and Authority: The Rhetoric of Obedience in the Pauline Tradition. Most recently, she is the co-editor of The Fortress Commentary on the Bible: The New Testament (2014) and author of A Lot of the Way Trees Were Walking: Poems from the Gospel of Mark (2015).
Jennifer Koosed, co-author of Judith, is professor of religious studies at Albright College in Reading, Pennsylvania. She is the author of several books including (Per)mutations of Qohelet: Reading the Body in the Book (Continuum, 2006); Gleaning Ruth: A Biblical Heroine and Her Afterlives (University of South Carolina, 2011); and Reading the Bible as a Feminist (Brill, 2017). She is also the editor of several works including The Bible and Posthumanism (SBL Press, 2014); and Reading with Feeling: Affect Theory and the Bible (with Fiona C. Black; SBL Press, 2019).
Alice Laffey, co-author of Ruth, taught Old Testament for thirty-five years at the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts, before retiring in May 2016. She is the author of many articles as well as Introduction to the Old Testament: A Feminist Perspective (Fortress, 1988), Appreciating God's Creation through Scripture (Paulist, 1997), The Pentateuch: A Liberation-Critical Reading (Fortress, 1998), and 1–2 Kings in the New Collegeville Bible Commentary series (Liturgical Press, 2012).
Julia O'Brien, author of Micah, is Paul H. and Grace L. Stern Professor of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament at Lancaster Theological Seminary in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. She is editor in chief of the Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and Gender Studies (2014), and her other publications include Challenging Prophetic Metaphor (Westminster John Knox, 2008); Nahum through Malachi (Abingdon Old Testament Commentary series, 2004); Nahum (Sheffield Academic Press, 2002; 2nd ed. 2009); andPriest and Levite in Malachi (Society of Biblical Literature Dissertation Series, 1990). She holds PhD and MDiv degrees from Duke University and a BA from Wake Forest University.
Carolyn Leeb, author of Daniel, ordained in the PC(USA), was a lecturer in theology and chair of gender studies at Valparaiso University. As an avid runner and mother of six, she earned her BS in chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a MDiv from San Francisco Theological, and a MTh and a PhD from Lutheran School of Theology in Chicago. Her recent publications include Away from the Father's House: The Social Location of Na'ar and Na'arah in Ancient Israel (Sheffield: Sheffield Academic, 2000).
Mahri Leonard-Fleckman, co-author of Ruth, is assistant professor of religious studies at the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts. She earned her PhD in 2014 from New York University in Hebrew and Judaic Studies, with a focus on Hebrew Bible and ancient Near Eastern Studies. Before coming to Holy Cross, Leonard-Fleckman was an assistant professor at Providence College, Rhode Island.
Amy-Jill Levine, editor, is university professor of New Testament and Jewish Studies, Carpenter Professor of New Testament Studies, and professor of Jewish Studies at Vanderbilt Divinity School and College of Arts and Science; she is also affiliated professor, Centre for the Study of Jewish-Christian Relations, Cambridge, United Kingdom. Her recent publications include The Misunderstood Jew: The Church and the Scandal of the Jewish Jesus (2006) and Short Stories by Jesus: The Enigmatic Parables of a Controversial Rabbi (2014). Dr. Levine is also coeditor of the Jewish Annotated New Testament (2011).
Leah Macinskas-Le, co-author of Sirach, is a PhD student in the department of sacred texts and their interpretation at the Graduate Theological Union in New Testament and Rabbinics. She is writing a dissertation on the rhetoric of Jewish halakhic debates in the Second Temple period, focusing on Sirach, the Gospel of Matthew, and the Dead Sea Scrolls. Leah has a BA in classics and critical theory from McGIll University, a Master of Divinity from Princeton Theological Seminary, and a Master of Arts in Ancient Judaism from the Jewish Theological Seminary of America.
Linda M. Maloney, editor, co-author of Acts of the Apostles, has translated many books including Jesus of Nazareth, No Irrelevant Jesus, and Is This All There Is? all by Gerhard Lohfink, published in English by Liturgical Press. Maloney is also the managing editor of The Bible Today.
J. Laura Manzo, co-author of Sirach, is associate professor of Scripture at St. Thomas University in Houston. She holds a STB in theology and an STL in biblical theology from the Gregorian University. She obtained her PhD in Hebrew Scripture from the Catholic University of America in Washington, DC.
Shelly Matthews, co-author of Luke, is the series editor for the SBL Press series Early Christianity and Its Literature; and co-editor of the Feminist Studies in Religion Book Series, FSRBooks. She is the author of Perfect Martyr: The Stoning of Stephen and the Construction of Christian Identity (Oxford University Press), and The Acts of the Apostles: Introduction and Study Guide: Taming the Tongues of Fire (T&T Clark).
Patricia McDonald, author of Jude, a member of the Society of the Holy Child Jesus, is currently Academic Program Director and teacher of New Testament at the Pontifical Beda College, Rome, where she has been since 2012. She has degrees from Cambridge and London Universities, the Pontifical Biblical Institute and the Catholic University of America. She has taught at Mount St Mary’s College (now University), Emmitsburg, Maryland, and at Ushaw College, Durham, England. Her publications include God and Violence: Biblical Resources for Living in a Small World (Herald Press, 2004), and articles on a variety of New Testament and related topics.
Monica Jyotsna Melanchthon, author of 1 Kings, is a church worker (ordained by the Andhra Evangelical Lutheran Church, India) and theological educator. She currently teaches Hebrew Bible/Old Testament at the Pilgrim Theological College, University of Divinity (Melbourne, Australia) and has published in various academic books focusing on interpretations of Old Testament texts from the Indian context and the perspectives of the marginalized, especially women.
Jill Middlemas, author of Esther, is currently a researcher with the University of Zurich, Switzerland, and was previously associate professor at Aarhus University in Denmark. She has a PhD from Oxford University where she studied the ideologies of exile and diaspora. She is the author of The Troubles of Templeless Judah (2005), The Templeless Age (2007), and The Divine Image (2014). Her interests span the study of the literature, history, and theology of the biblical and intertestamental worlds, with a particular interest in how historical traditions are reframed in communal memory and mobilized in local communities.
Michele Murray, author of Tobit
Julia O'Brien, author of Micah, is Paul H. and Grace L. Stern Professor of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament at Lancaster Theological Seminary in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. She is editor in chief of the Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and Gender Studies (2014), and her other publications include Challenging Prophetic Metaphor (Westminster John Knox, 2008); Nahum through Malachi (Abingdon Old Testament Commentary series, 2004); Nahum (Sheffield Academic Press, 2002; 2nd ed. 2009); andPriest and Levite in Malachi (Society of Biblical Literature Dissertation Series, 1990). She holds PhD and MDiv degrees from Duke University and a BA from Wake Forest University.
Song-Mi Suzie Park, author of 2 Kings, (PhD, Harvard University, 2010) serves as the associate professor of Old Testament at Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary, where she teaches courses on literary approaches to the biblical text, families, and issues of gender and sexuality. She is the author of Hezekiah and the Dialogue of Memory (Fortress Press, 2015) as well as several articles and essays.
Melanie M. Peetz, co-author of Exodus, is the professor for biblical studies and the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible in Frankfurt and Main, Germany, at Sankt Georgen Graduate School of Philosophy and Theology. In her academic work, she focuses especially on emotions in the Bible and on female characters in the biblical and in the rabbinic literature. Consequently, she has published several books including one on the emotions in Song of Songs, and a textbook about the history of Ancient Israel. Currently she is co-authoring a book on marriage and the family in the Bible.

Pheme Perkins, author of 1 Peter
Ahida Calderón Pilarski, editor, co-author ofJeremiah, holds a PhD in Hebrew Bible from the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago. She is an associate professor and chair of the Theology Department at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire. Pilarski has written extensively on the intersection of gender and culture/ethnicity/race in the interpretation of the Bible.
Barbara E. Reid, general editor, co-author of Luke, is a Dominican Sister of Grand Rapids, Michigan. She holds a PhD in biblical studies from The Catholic University of America and is professor of New Testament studies at Catholic Theological Union, Chicago. Her most recent publications areWisdom’s Feast: An Invitation to Feminist Interpretation of the Scriptures (2016) and Abiding Word: Sunday Reflections on Year A, B, C (3 vols.; 2011, 2012, 2013). She served as vice president and academic dean at CTU from 2009 to 2018 and as president of the Catholic Biblical Association in 2014–2015.
Ivoni Richter Reimer, co-author of Acts of the Apostles
Eloise Rosenblatt, author of 2 Peter, is a Sister of Mercy, a theologian and attorney in private practice in family law in California. She holds an MA in comparative literature from the University of Southern California and a PhD from the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley. She was the first US woman admitted to the graduate program at the École Biblique et Archaéologique Française in Jerusalem, Israel in 1981. She is editor-author of Where Can We Find Her? Searching for Women’s Identity in the New Church (Paulist, 1991) and Paul the Accused: His Portrait in Acts (Glazier-Liturgical Press: 1995). Among other scholarly articles, she authored entries on Jude and 2 Peter in Schüssler-Fiorenza’s anthology Searching the Scriptures (Crossroad, 1994).
Susanne Scholz, author of 1 Samuel, is professor of Old Testament at Perkins School of Theology at Southern Methodist University (SMU) in Dallas, Texas. Among her fourteen books and over sixty essays and journal articles are The Bible as Political Artifact: On the Feminist Study of the Hebrew Bible (Fortress Press, 2017) and Introducing the Women’s Hebrew Bible: Feminism, Gender Justice, and the Study of the Old Testament (second rev. and exp. edn; T&T Clark Bloomsbury, 2017). She also is the editor of the book series Feminist Studies and Sacred Texts (Lexington Books).
Elisabeth Schüssler Fiorenza, editorial consultant, author of Ephesians, Krister Stendahl Professor at Harvard University Divinity School, is an internationally known biblical scholar and path-breaking feminist intellectual. She has done pioneering work in biblical interpretation and feminist theology. Dr. Schüssler Fiorenza is the co-founding senior editor of the Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion, was the first woman president of the Society of Biblical Literature, and was elected a member to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2001. Her landmark work, In Memory of Her, has become a classic in biblical studies.
Robert Seesengood, co-author of Judith, is associate dean for first year and general studies and professor of religious studies at Albright College in Reading, Pennsylvania. He received his ThM (New Testament) from Princeton Theological Seminary and his PhD (History of Ancient Christianity) from Drew University. He is a frequent lecturer, an editor, and author of several essays and monographs including Philemon (Bloomsbury, 2017), Paul: A Brief History (Wiley-Blackwell, 2010), and, with Jennifer Koosed, Jesse’s Lineage: The Legendary Lives of David, Jesus and Jesse James (T & T Clark, 2013).
Terry Ann Smith, co-author of Ezra-Nehemiah, is the associate dean of institutional assessment and assistant professor of biblical studies at New Brunswick Theological Seminary in New Brunswick, New Jersey. Her research interests and publications focus on inspections of the Hebrew Bible that expose normalized inequitable distributions of power and privilege as these intersect categories of ethnicity, class, and gender. She is particularly interested in contextualized socio-political readings of biblical texts that foster conversations which address the theological, practical, and ethical applications of the Bible by the church. 
F. Scott Spencer author of Song of Songs, (PhD, Durham University, England) has been a professor of biblical studies at Wingate University (North Carolina) and Baptist Theological Seminary at Richmond (Virginia). He has authored several books and numerous articles related to his interests in biblical interpretation, women and the Bible, the Bible and emotion, Song of Songs, and Luke and Acts. He was co-founder and chair of the "Bible and Emotion" group for the Society of Biblical Literature and is former president of the Southeastern Commission for the Study of Religion (SECSOR).
Elsa Tamez, author of Philippians, is a Mexican-Costarrican New Testament biblical scholar. She is a member of the Methodist church and is professor emerita and former rector of the Latin American Biblical University. She earned her ThD at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland. Her most recent publications include Struggles for Power in Early Christianity (2007); No discriminen a los pobres. Lectura de Santiago (2008); El Nuevo Testamento, Palabra por Palabra, interlineal griego-español (2012).
Beth Tanner, author of Psalms, Introduction and Book 1
Sarah Tanzer, editor, serves as professor of New Testament and Early Judaism at McCormick Theological Seminary in Chicago, Illinois. She has written several essays on feminist interpretation of ancient texts including “Wisdom of Solomon” in Women’s Bible Commentary (3rd edition; 2012) and “Ephesians” in Searching the Scriptures: A Feminist Commentary (1994). Her other research interests have included the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Gospel of John, the historically Jewish Jesus, and most recently, how difference develops in biblical interpretation between Judaism and early Christianity.
Johanna W H van Wijk-Bos, author of Deuteronomy
Marie-Theres Wacker, author of Baruch and the Letter of Jeremiah, professor of Old Testament and women's research at the Faculty of Catholic Theology, University of Muenster, Germany. She is director of the Seminar for Old Testament Exegesis and runs a research unit for gender studies in theology. Her fields of teaching, research, and publication include feminist biblical hermeneutics, biblical monotheism, early Jewish writings from Hellenistic times, and reception history of the Bible. Together with Luise Schottroff, she edited Feminist Biblical Interpretation: A Compendium, a feminist commentary on the Christian Bible and selected noncanonical writings.
Megan Warner, co-author of Genesis
Jaime L. Waters, co-author of Jeremiah, is an associate professor in Catholic Studies at DePaul University in Chicago. She holds a PhD from Johns Hopkins University, MA from Yale University, and BA from Boston College. She is the author of Threshing Floors in Ancient Israel: Their Ritual and Symbolic Significance (Fortress Press 2015).

Lauress Wilkins Lawrence, editor, author of Joel, Obadiah, Jonah, is an African-American Hebrew Bible scholar. She holds an AB from Smith College, and an MDiv and PhD from Boston University. She is the author of The Book of Lamentations and the Social World of Judah in the Neo-Babylonian Era (Gorgias Press, 2010). Previously on the religious studies faculty at Regis College in Weston, Massachusetts, she now balances her time as an independent scholar with her work in philanthropy in Maine.
Antoinette Wire, author of 2 Corinthians, is Robert S. Dollar Professor Emerita of New Testament Studies at San Francisco Theological Seminary and the Graduate Theological Union where she taught since 1973. Dr. Wire is a graduate of Yale Divinity and Claremont Graduate School. Raised in China by missionary parents, she has lived her adult life largely in California.
Lisa Michele Wolfe, author of Qoheleth (Ecclesiastes), is professor of Hebrew Bible, Endowed Chair, at Oklahoma City University (OCU) and also teaches for Saint Paul School of Theology, OCU campus. Lisa is ordained in the United Church of Christ and preaches and teaches regularly in the community and across the country. Her Bible study DVDs, "Uppity Women of the Bible," and companion commentary Ruth, Esther, Song of Songs and Judith, were published in 2010 and 2011, respectively. In 2018 she received the Distinguished Faculty Award for the OCU Honors Program and the University Outstanding Faculty Award.
Malka Zeiger Simkovich, co-author of Zechariah, is the Crown-Ryan Chair of Jewish Studies and the director of the Catholic-Jewish Studies program at Catholic Theological Union in Chicago. She earned a doctoral degree in Second Temple and Rabbinic Judaism from Brandeis University and a MA in Hebrew Bible from Harvard University. Her first book, The Making of Jewish Universalism: From Exile to Alexandria was published in 2016, and her second book, Discovering Second Temple Literature: The Scriptures and Stories That Shaped Early Judaism, was published in 2018.